I support Hillary Rodham Clinton for president.

Regular, loyal readers may remember back in March when I endorsed Sen. Bernie Sanders for the same post. And, yes, I denigrated Clinton harshly for some faults.

Call me a turncoat if that’s your fancy.

But following the primaries, I asked myself the same question as those who also felt the Bern: Can I vote for Clinton?

After appraising her bona fides, I resolutely concluded yes.

Clinton’s four decades of public service compose arguably the strongest résumé amongst the wide slate of candidates in 2016.

Following her husband Bill’s ascent to the governorship of Arkansas and the presidency, she stands with Eleanor Roosevelt and Michelle Obama as a highly influential first lady, fighting for women’s rights and universal healthcare. She served eight years as a popular senator for New York, working on five committees and enacting legislation with bipartisan support. Letting bygones be bygones after the hard-fought 2008 presidential primary, Clinton accepted President Obama’s nomination to join his cabinet as secretary of state with the explicit mission of repairing damage to America’s reputation abroad. To that end, she visited 112 countries, mended diplomatic ties and continued advocating for the rights of women around the world.

While watching the Democratic National Convention — a propagandistic highlight reel summarizing her prolific career — I realized not even Sanders could stack up against her.

Hillary Clinton is not perfect. I still take umbrage with her hawkishness and apparent coziness with Wall Street, as well as the tragic repercussions of the 1994 crime bill.

But examining Clinton’s flaws and fumbles alongside shyster-bigot Donald Trump’s alleged crimes is like comparing apples and charred steaks.

Clinton’s campaign has circled around what makes America great now and how to improve upon these values in a brighter future. Trump, on the other hand, has obsessed only on past failures, heaving blame upon scapegoats and riling up distrust and hatred against all who are not white, straight, Christian men.

Further, business acumen doesn’t necessarily translate well into governance, mainly because government is not a for-profit venture.

Besides, Trump is a terrible businessman.

No matter what detractors say, we need a professional politician for our president, not a professional con man. And while Clinton touts a hefty lead in national polls, she needs every vote possible in North Carolina, the swingiest of swing states. At this point, leftist complacence is her only enemy.

Even considering the circumstances, Hillary Rodham Clinton is my choice for president. She’ll be a damned good one.

 

Anthony Harrison is Triad City Beat’s sports columnist and former intern.