Barometer: Do you actually like beach music?

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[poll id=”35″]

There’s been some discussion in our office lately about the merits (or lack thereof) of beach music, a genre that seems to be particularly prevalent in these parts. Tell us why in the comments, and we’ll publish the results in next week’s print issue.

  • Carolina Beach Music has a rich history and brought R&B to the main stream population when it was classified as “race” music. White kids were not supposed to listen to “that” music. The Carolina Shag is the official dance of both NC and SC. The music itself is generally upbeat, with a specific tempo, easy to listen to, and has lasted for more than half a century. It doesn’t matter what time of year I hear it, I am immediately transported to a warm, summer day. “I love beach music; I always have and I always will. There ain’t no other kind of music in the world that gives me quite the thrill.”

  • Bob Campbell

    With roots deep in the history of R&B Beach Music has been a lively addition to the Carolinas music scene for over sixty years. While it’s safe to say its creative high point is decades past, the Beach Music catalogue of songs and bands is rich and deep. I’ve been involved with dozens of events in the Triad featuring beach music over the last ten years and I have never ceased to be impressed by the passion of the fans, who range in age from discovering it for the first time (likely as some sort of sorority ritual involving sweet wine and sun dresses) to seventy something’s who have been shagging since the late fifties. As with any genre or sub-genre, a lot of the material is formulaic junk but there exist many true pop classics. I.e. “Under The Boardwalk” by the Drifters, ” What Kind of Fool” by the Tams and “Give Me Just A Little More Time” by the Chairmen of the Board.

  • The music is enjoyable, somewhat because of the Carolina connections mentioned above. The crowd at the concerts is a little too croakie and boat shoes for my taste.

  • “Carolina Girls” is my analogue to Jeff Laughlin’s “Don’t Stop Believin’.”

  • Louise Hudson

    It’s homage to my happy youth, and it carries me back to my summer vacations at Cherry Grove Beach, SC. I remember listening to early reggae music years later and was amazed how much beach music had taken from that genre. It’s fun, but only in small doses these days. I listen occasionally to the Saturday morning radio beach music show on WQFS 90.9 FM, just for the memories of joy and innocence!